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let's grow old together and die at the same time;
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rock-me-sexy-jesus:

I would end someone’s life if they did this to me.

rock-me-sexy-jesus:

I would end someone’s life if they did this to me.

Buti pa yung joy abot dalawang linggo. Pero yung forever mo nabitin lang ako.

bracefacedkid:

image

maestrangdyosa:

I salute guys that even after a break-up, he’d still silently protect her and watch over her instead of spreading rumors and shit about her, he’d still care for her even they already decided to split their ways, he’d never try to mess up with her just because they decided to remove each other from their own lives. Guys, I salute you.

maestrangdyosa:

I salute guys that even after a break-up, he’d still silently protect her and watch over her instead of spreading rumors and shit about her, he’d still care for her even they already decided to split their ways, he’d never try to mess up with her just because they decided to remove each other from their own lives. Guys, I salute you.

thatonenerdybroad:

eddietg:

If you own a dog, please share.

Even if you don’t own a dog, please share

thatonenerdybroad:

eddietg:

If you own a dog, please share.

Even if you don’t own a dog, please share

ex-trovertedintrovert:

"All those paper people living in their paper houses, burning the future to stay warm. All the paper kids drinking beer some bum bought them at the paper convenience store. Everyone demented with the mania of owning things. All the things paper-thin and paper-frail. And all the people, too. I’ve lived here for eighteen years and I have never once in my life come across anyone who cares about anything that matters." -Margo Roth Spiegelman
Even if this is the most metaphor-filled book I’ve ever read, I was still inspired by the messages that John Green was able to transcend to me. Paper Towns had a different meaning in each of the three parts of the book, which I’m pretty lazy to elaborate. I’ll just talk about the three parts (and main metaphors) of the book. 
The String. It signifies that we’re in a world that we can be irreparably broken. Ever cut a string? Of course, once you cut the very thin threads that connect the string, you can never glue it back, unless you tie each end. I interconnected this metaphor to the japanese word “kintsukuroi” (which I’ll get inked on my inner arm this October) which means that “it became beautiful for having been broken.” Idk, I just think when you cut a string, maybe the original connection was lost, but you still can connect it again and even make a more beautiful connection, in this case, I’m pertaining to knots and ribbons. In this book, I think it’s when Margo had a one fun night with Q; that was the original connection. Then Margo left for an unknown place, and the days that passed while she was away were the more beautiful connection. As Q researched about her signs, he was able to understand and connect to her more.
The Grass. This signifies that our roots are interdependent. What happens to one, happens to all. Simple as that. This root system is what makes us understand another person. We can put ourselves in a person’s shoes, but we can never fully be what he/she is. In this book, this is when Q is contemplating about clues that Margo has left for him. In order to find where she is, Q needs to understand who Margo is by looking and analyzing the things that Margo usually does.
The Vessel. The only time to truly see what’s outside, is when the vessel finally cracks. When a vessel is still whole, you’re like trapped inside and you only see yourself and what’s inside you. But once it’s cracked and continues to fall apart, you’ll be able to see others, and what’s inside them. It’s like looking at a tinted window. Unless the glass cracks and inevitably breaks, you won’t be able to see what’s in it. In this book, it’s when Margo broke down and opened up to Q and tell him why she ran away.
John Green really used beautiful metaphors for this book. I was in awe with what he wants us to comprehend. I must say that in reading this book, I realized something - "Loving someone means connecting to him/her like a string, a grass, and a vessel. You must not only simply understand him/her, you should see what’s inside him/her and most especially, right through him/her."
PS. The metaphors are John Green’s and mine combined. 

ex-trovertedintrovert:

"All those paper people living in their paper houses, burning the future to stay warm. All the paper kids drinking beer some bum bought them at the paper convenience store. Everyone demented with the mania of owning things. All the things paper-thin and paper-frail. And all the people, too. I’ve lived here for eighteen years and I have never once in my life come across anyone who cares about anything that matters." -Margo Roth Spiegelman

Even if this is the most metaphor-filled book I’ve ever read, I was still inspired by the messages that John Green was able to transcend to me. Paper Towns had a different meaning in each of the three parts of the book, which I’m pretty lazy to elaborate. I’ll just talk about the three parts (and main metaphors) of the book. 

The String. It signifies that we’re in a world that we can be irreparably broken. Ever cut a string? Of course, once you cut the very thin threads that connect the string, you can never glue it back, unless you tie each end. I interconnected this metaphor to the japanese word “kintsukuroi” (which I’ll get inked on my inner arm this October) which means that “it became beautiful for having been broken.” Idk, I just think when you cut a string, maybe the original connection was lost, but you still can connect it again and even make a more beautiful connection, in this case, I’m pertaining to knots and ribbons. In this book, I think it’s when Margo had a one fun night with Q; that was the original connection. Then Margo left for an unknown place, and the days that passed while she was away were the more beautiful connection. As Q researched about her signs, he was able to understand and connect to her more.

The Grass. This signifies that our roots are interdependent. What happens to one, happens to all. Simple as that. This root system is what makes us understand another person. We can put ourselves in a person’s shoes, but we can never fully be what he/she is. In this book, this is when Q is contemplating about clues that Margo has left for him. In order to find where she is, Q needs to understand who Margo is by looking and analyzing the things that Margo usually does.

The Vessel. The only time to truly see what’s outside, is when the vessel finally cracks. When a vessel is still whole, you’re like trapped inside and you only see yourself and what’s inside you. But once it’s cracked and continues to fall apart, you’ll be able to see others, and what’s inside them. It’s like looking at a tinted window. Unless the glass cracks and inevitably breaks, you won’t be able to see what’s in it. In this book, it’s when Margo broke down and opened up to Q and tell him why she ran away.

John Green really used beautiful metaphors for this book. I was in awe with what he wants us to comprehend. I must say that in reading this book, I realized something - "Loving someone means connecting to him/her like a string, a grass, and a vessel. You must not only simply understand him/her, you should see what’s inside him/her and most especially, right through him/her."

PS. The metaphors are John Green’s and mine combined. 

so-personal:

everything personal♡

so-personal:

everything personal♡